OSHA cites New Jersey Manufacturer $151,329 for Safety Lapse Again After Employee Amputation

April 1, 2020

OSHA cited New Jersey Manufacturer for safety lapse after employee amputation.
United States Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited BWay Corp. dba Mauser Packaging Solutions for workplace health and safety hazards following an employee suffering an amputation at their Lawrence Township, NJ facility. The employee was cleaning a machine when the amputation occurred. The company was cited for failing to use procedures to protect employees from hazardous energy. 
"Workers servicing or maintaining machines are at risk of serious injury, including amputations, if hazardous energy is not properly controlled," said OSHA Marlton Area Office Director Paula Dixon-Roderick. "This company must correct the hazards identified to protect workers' safety."

OSHA cites Assura Windows and Doors LLC $162,688 for amputation

March 30, 2020

OSHA cited Florida Manufacturer for amputation and other safety and health hazards.
OSHA cited Assura Windows and Doors LLC for exposing employees to amputation, noise, struck-by and other safety and health hazards at the manufacturing facility in Pompano Beach, FL.
"Employers are required by law to protect the safety and health of their workers," said OSHA Fort Lauderdale Area Office Director Condell Eastmond. "OSHA offers compliance assistance resources and specialists that can help employers identify and correct hazards in their workplaces."

OSHA Cites Dollar Tree Stores Inc. $523,745 for Exposing Employees to Fire Hazards

March 5, 2020

Dollar Tree Stores Inc. was cited by OSHA for exposing employees to fire hazards.
United States Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited Dollar Tree Stores Inc. for exit, storage and fire hazards at a store in Boston, Massachusetts. OSHA inspectors found store employees exposed to fire hazards from obstructed exit routes and electrical hazards from blocked working space around electrical panels. 
"OSHA continues to receive complaints about unsafe working conditions at Dollar Tree stores across the nation," said Loren Sweatt, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health. "Workers should not be subjected to the same hazards previously identified and cited. This employer is required to follow the law, and comply with regulations that protect workers from injuries and fatalities."

OSHA Cites R&R Contracting Services $52,626 for Multiple Hazards Following Workplace Fatality

February 28, 2020

OSHA cited R&R Contracting Services for multiple hazards following a workplace fatality.
O'FALLON, MO - DOL's Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited R&R Contracting Services, Inc., from O'Fallen, Missouri after an employee suffered fatal injuries when he was crushed by an industrial truck. 
OSHA stated the company did not adequately train employees on safe use of forklifts, along with electrical and fire safety hazards, improper storage of oxygen and gas cylinders. "Powered industrial trucks must be maintained and operated safely to prevent worker injury," said OSHA St. Louis Area Office Director Bill McDonald. "Employers must develop comprehensive safety and health programs to address known issues in their facilities, and train workers on proper safety and health precautions."

OSHA cites Georgia Mulch Manufacturer $148,867 for Exposing Employees to Amputation

February 20, 2020
 
The United States Department of Labor cited Georgia Mulch Manufacturer for exposing employees to amputation and struck-by hazards.
DOL’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited Garick, LLC, operating as Smith Garden Products, for exposing employees to safety hazards.
They were cited for failing to train employees to recognize applicable hazardous energy sources, and conduct a periodic inspection of the program at least annually. "Employers must implement comprehensive safety and health programs to readily identify and correct hazards in the workplace to prevent injuries or fatalities," said OSHA Atlanta-East Acting Area Office Director Michael Hejazi.

OSHA cites NJ Aluminum Manufacturer $169,524 for Safety Failures after Employee Hospitalized

January 27, 2020
 
OSHA again cited New Jersey Aluminum Manufacturer for safety failures after an employee was hospitalized.
OSHA cited Aluminum Shapes, LLC, for workplace health and safety hazards after a crane operator was injured at the manufacturer’s Delair NJ foundry. 
The employee was hospitalized from a steel plate falling from an uninspected crane onto his foot. The company was cited for failing to report the injury to OSHA within 24 hours of the employee’s hospitalization.
“Aluminum Shapes continues to disregard their legal responsibility to comply with safety and health standards,” said OSHA Area Director Paula Dixon-Roderick, in Marlton, New Jersey. “Employers have an obligation to provide a safe and healthful workplace for their workers.”

Philadelphia Refinery cited $132,600 for Process Safety Management Hazards

January 17, 2020
 
The United States Department of Labor Cited PA Refinery for Process Safety Management Hazards after Fire and Explosions
In Philadelphia, OSHA cited Philadelphia Energy Solutions for safety and health hazards related to process safety management after a fire at the company’s Girard Point Refinery Complex in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
OSHA’s inspection found deficiencies in the refinery’s PSM program including failing to establish or implement written procedures.
“When employers fail to evaluate and address potential hazardous conditions associated with chemical processes, catastrophic events such as this can occur,” said OSHA Philadelphia Area Director Theresa Downs. “OSHA’s Process Safety Management standard requires that employers conduct regular inspections to ensure process equipment meets industry standards.”

Department of Labor Cited Georgia Tire Distribution Center for workplace hazards

December 27, 2019

The Department of Labor Cited Georgia Tire Distribution Center for fall and other workplace hazards

OSHA cited Mavis Southeast LLC, operating as Mavis Discount Tire, for exposing employees to fall, struck-by and other hazards at the company’s distribution facility in Buford, Georgia. The company faces $191,895 in penalties.
OSHA cited the tire company for exposing employees to fire hazards by failing to ensure emergency exits were not blocked and there was signage to the nearest exit. Other violations include exposing employees to struck-by and crushing hazards from damaged storage shelving, and failing to inspect fall protection equipment, train employees on the safe operation of powered industrial trucks, and mark aisles and passageways.
"Implementing comprehensive safety and health programs that include steps for identifying and eliminating hazards protects workers, and can help prevent injuries and illnesses," saidOSHA Area Director William Fulcher, in Atlanta-East. 

OSHA Cites UPS Incorporated for Exposing Employees to Hazards

December 11, 2019

U.S. Department of Labor Cites UPS Incorporated for Exposing Employees to Fire and ther hazards

OSHA cited United Parcel Service Inc. for exposing employees to multiple hazards including exit access, fire and electrical at the shipping and delivery facility in Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts. The company faces $431,517 in penalties for four repeated and seven serious safety violations.
OSHA inspectors found several violations affecting employees’ ability to evacuate safely in the event of a fire or other emergency. The Agency cited the company for obstructed and inadequate exit routes, lack of proper exit signage, failure to update the facility’s emergency action plan, poor housekeeping, lack of stair rails and improper use of energized electrical cords.
“Employers must continually evaluate their facilities for hazards, and develop comprehensive safety and health programs to adequately protect workers,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Loren Sweatt.
“The hazardous conditions at this UPS facility can impede a worker’s ability to promptly exit in an emergency, placing them at risk for serious or fatal injuries,” said OSHA Braintree Area Director James Mulligan. “Employers are required by law to provide workers with safe and healthful workplaces.”

OSHA fines Dollar Tree Stores Inc. for Exposing Employees to Hazards

December 6, 2019

DOL fines Dollar Tree Stores Inc. for Exposing Employees to Exit and Storage Hazards

OSHA has cited Dollar Tree Stores Incorporated for exit and storage hazards at a store in Bloomfield, Connecticut. The national discount retailer faces $208,384 in penalties.
Responding to a complaint, OSHA inspectors found the store's emergency exits blocked by rolling conveyor equipment and stored merchandise, and boxes of products stacked unsafely, creating the potential for falling loads, and tripping and fire hazards. OSHA cited Dollar Tree Stores Inc. for two repeat violations for these conditions. OSHA has cited the company multiple times for similar hazards at stores around the nation, including after recent inspections in Falmouth, Massachusetts, and Elmira, New York.
"Dollar Tree Stores Inc. has an extensive history of exposing workers to hazardous conditions," said OSHA Hartford Area Director Dale Varney. "Improper storage of merchandise and blocked exit routes create unnecessary risks to workers and customers. This employer is legally responsible for ensuring workers are provided a safe workplace."

OSHA Fines Maine Roofing Contractor for Repeatedly Endangering Employees

November 27, 2019

The United States Department of Labor Cites, Fines Maine Roofing Contractor for Repeatedly Endangering Employees

In Augusta, Maine, the US DOL, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, has cited the owner of Purvis Home Improvement Company, Incorporated for willful, repeat and serious workplace safety violations at a jobsite in Springvale, Maine. The roofing contractor faces a total of $278,456 in new penalties.
OSHA initiated an inspection in response to a complaint. Inspectors found three employees working on a two-story residential roof without fall protection. OSHA also cited the employer for allowing employees to work on scaffolds near energized power lines, using ladders with side rails that did not extend at least 3 feet above upper work surfaces.
“OSHA regulations require that employees working at heights wear fall protection,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Loren Sweatt. “This employer’s ongoing defiance of the law continues to place his workers at risk for disabling and fatal injuries.”

OSHA Cites Utility Pole Company $18,564 in Heat-Related Fatality

 October 29, 2019
 
OSHA Cites Utility Pole Company $18,564 in Heat-Related Fatality
 
OSHA cited Smith Mountain Investments LLC after a heat-related fatality at a jobsite in Inman, Nebraska.
An employee became ill while performing extreme physical activity in excessive temperatures in July 2019 and later died. OSHA cited the Anson, Maine-based company for two serious safety and health violations for failing to protect workers from hazards associated with heavy physical activity in extreme heat conditions, and ensure medical care was available. 
"Death from heat related illness is a preventable tragedy," said OSHA Omaha Acting Area Director Matt Thurlby. "When working in dangerously high temperatures, employers are responsible for implementing a heat safety program that includes modifying work practices, using controls to reduce heat stress and requiring water and rest breaks in shaded areas."
 

OSHA Fines Texas Company $301,188 After Fatality

 October 11, 2019
 
OSHA Fines Texas Company $301,188 After Fatality
 
OSHA cited Liquid Environmental Solutions of Texas LLC for workplace safety hazards following an employee fatality at the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport in April 2019. 
The employee suffered asphyxiation while inside a manhole access space that lacked adequate oxygen, and a means to escape. OSHA determined that the company - which provides vacuum trucks to empty the airport’s grease traps - lacked proper procedures, training and equipment for accessing the permit-required confined space.
“This tragedy could have been prevented if the company had followed proper safety procedures, such as air testing, communication systems and non-entry retrieval devices for employee rescue situations,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, Loren Sweatt.
“Companies are legally required to test and monitor confined spaces for oxygen content before and during entry,” said OSHA Regional Administrator Eric Harbin.
 

OSHA Cites Missouri Food Flavoring Manufacturer $223,525 for Workplace Safety Violations After Fatality

 October 3, 2019
 
OSHA Cites Missouri Food Flavoring Manufacturer $223,525 for Workplace Safety Violations After Fatality
 
OSHA cited Kerry Inc. for failing to provide fall protection to employees working in the company’s facility in Greenville, Missouri. 
An employee fatally fell while trying to extinguish a fire at the plant. After an April 2019 inspection, OSHA determined that the company failed to designate, train and educate a fire brigade properly on how to respond to such emergencies; evaluate hazards to determine the need for personal protective equipment; provide approved self-contained breathing apparatus; complete required safety data sheets; and repair damaged parts. OSHA has placed the company in the Severe Violator Enforcement Program.
"This preventable tragedy should remind all employers of their obligation to evaluate their training programs and safety procedures continually, and to provide refresher training to ensure that workers are prepared for potential emergencies,” said OSHA St. Louis Area Director Bill McDonald.
 

OSHA Fines Mississippi Manufacturer $53,040 for Exposing Employees to Safety Hazards

 September 30, 2019   
 
OSHA Fines Mississippi Manufacturer $53,040 for Exposing Employees to Safety Hazards
 
OSHA cited a manufacturer and supplier of electrical transmission and distribution equipment, Howard Industries Inc., for exposing employees to struck-by and fall hazards after a fatality at the company’s Laurel, Mississippi, facility.  
The employee was performing a leak test on a transformer when a drive chain supporting the equipment failed. OSHA cited the company for failing to ensure that employees used appropriate drive and safety chains; properly inspect, use, and maintain the chains; conduct a periodic inspection of the energy control procedures; ensure that procedures for using the leak test device explained how to isolate or control the release of hazardous energy; and provide fall protection.
“Employers have a duty to provide a workplace free from recognizable hazards,” said OSHA Jackson Area Director Courtney Bohannon. “Regularly inspecting equipment, training employees on the hazards they are exposed to and proper precautions are essential to their safety.”
 

US DOL Fines New York Contractor $168,772 for Health and Safety Hazards

 September 25, 2019
 
US DOL Fines New York Contractor $168,772 for Health and Safety Hazards
 
OSHA cited Rex Harper dbs REH Property Maintenance for improper asbestos removal and disposal at Superior Steel Door & Trim Company, Inc. in Jamestown, New York. 
Superior Steel Door & Trim Co. Inc. contracted with Harper to remove asbestos from piping. OSHA inspectors determined that Harper failed to protect employees from exposure to asbestos; perform asbestos work in a regulated area, with proper barriers, ventilation, and enclosures; use proper engineering controls and work practices; clean up and dispose of asbestos materials; launder and transport protective clothing; and implement respiratory protection and asbestos training programs for employees.
OSHA cited Superior Steel Door & Trim Co. Inc. for failing to determine the presence, location, and quantity of asbestos-containing materials; develop and implement a chemical hazard communication program; and for a fall hazard involving a forklift. Proposed penalties total $12,124. The citations for both companies can be viewed here.
"Asbestos is a known human carcinogen and can cause chronic lung disease, lung cancer, and other cancers," said OSHA’s Buffalo Area Director Michael Scime. "Employers are legally obligated to comply with OSHA standards on toxic and hazardous substances to ensure workers are protected from exposure."
 

US DOL Fines Colorado Homebuilder $132,598 for Hazards

September 13, 2019
 
US DOL Fines Colorado Homebuilder $132,598 for Hazards
 
The United States Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited Century Communities Inc., a homebuilder based in Colorado, for exposing employees to fall hazards. 
An OSHA inspection revealed the company did not conduct regular inspections of the jobsite or ensure that workers used adequate protection during framing and roofing activities.
 

The Department of Labor Cites Commercial Roofing Contractor $220,249

August 20, 2019

In Lake Barrington, IL, cited Five Star Roofing Systems Incorporated which is based in Hartford City, Indiana, for exposing employees to fall hazards while performing roofing work at a commercial building site in Lake Barrington, Illinois.
OSHA inspectors cited the company for willful, repeated, and serious safety violations for failing to provide head, eye, face and fall protection and for failing to designate a safety monitor.

“This company has violated required safety standards repeatedly and placed employees at risk for serious injuries,” said OSHA’s Chicago North Area Director Angeline Loftus. “Employers must develop and implement safety procedures on every jobsite to ensure that employees are protected from falls and other workplace safety hazards.” 

United States Department of Labor Cites New York Frozen Foods Packager $200,791

August 15, 2019

In Buffalo, NY, Arbre Group Holding dba Holli-Pac Incorporated was cited for willful and serious violations of workplace health and safety standards at its facility.
OSHA inspectors found the company exposed employees to laceration and amputation hazards related to a package filler machine. OSHA also cited the company for failing to train employees on hazardous chemicals in the workplace and ensure employees wore appropriate eye and face protection.

“Employers that do not comply with the law will see full and fair enforcement,” said OSHA’s Buffalo Area Director Michael Scime. “Maintaining a safe workplace involves employers regularly conducting analyses to find and fix hazards, and training workers to recognize those hazards before they cause injury or illness.” 

The United States Department of Labor Fines South Jersey Wholesale Produce Supplier $236,089

August 8, 2019

In pleasantville, NJ, Paris Produce Incorporated faces fines for failing to correct workplace hazards identified during a previous investigation at the wholesale supplier’s facility.
OSHA initiated a follow-up inspection after Paris Produce Incorporated failed to respond to citations previously issued. During the follow-up visit, OSHA inspectors found two failure-to-abate violations for allowing employees to operate forklifts without proper training, and failing to develop and implement a hazard communication program for employees using chemicals for cleaning and sanitation.

“By failing to fix previously cited hazards, Paris Produce continues to expose employees to preventable workplace safety and health hazards, which is unacceptable,” said OSHA Area Director Paula Dixon-Roderick, in Marlton, New Jersey. 

US DOL fines Norcross, GA Transit Service Provider $188,714

July 22, 2019

In Norcross, GA, Transdev Services Incorporated faces penalties in the form of fines for exposing employees at a Norcross, Georgia worksite to safety and health hazards.
OSHA cited Transdev Services for obstructing access to emergency eyewash and shower stations designed to minimize the effects of employee exposure to corrosive chemicals. OSHA also cited the company for failing to ensure to label hazardous chemicals; provide training on hazardous chemicals and incipient stage firefighting and fire extinguisher use.

“Employers have a legal duty to continuously identify and eliminate safety and health hazards at their work sites,” said OSHA Atlanta-East Area Director William Fulcher. “OSHA’s safety and health standards are in place to ensure that employees can make it home to their families after work each day.” 

The U.S. Dept. of Labor Investigation Fines Oklahoma Manufacturer $187,533

July 15, 2019

In Pryor, OK, HE&M Incorporated, a Pryor, Oklahoma-based metalworking band saw manufacturer, was fined by OSHA for exposing employees to fall, machine guarding, struck-by, and electrical hazards.
OSHA initiated a safety inspection of the facility after the company submitted OSHA 300A injury and illness information that showed a higher-than-average injury rate. The inspection identified 19 serious violations and one other-than-serious violation.

“Employers are legally obligated to address hazards immediately, as well as identify and correct injury hazards in their facility,” said OSHA Area Director Steven Kirby, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

The U.S. Dept of Labor Cites Georgia Distributor $125,466

June 24, 2019

In Lawrenceville, GA, Woodgrain Millwork Company has been fined $125,466 for exposing employees to chemical and struck-by hazards at the company’s distribution facility.
OSHA cited the wood molding, window, and door distributor for failing to provide employees with eye, face and hand protection to prevent exposure to chemical injuries, and provide a functioning eyewash station for employees handling corrosive chemicals.

“An employer’s obligation to provide a safe workplace includes supplying workers with personal protective equipment to protect them from identified hazards,” said OSHA Atlanta-East Area Director William Fulcher. “Employers are required to correct hazards before they cause injury or illness.” 

The United States Dept. of Labor Cites Alabama Auto Parts Manufacturer along with Staffing Agencies $145,438

June 18, 2019

In Auburn Alabama, automobile parts manufacturer Donghee Alabama LLC and also 2 staffing agencies (J & C Enterprise LLC and Jian Enterprise LLC) collectively received fines of $145,438 for exposing employees to safety hazards.
Donghee Alabama LLC was cited for willfully exposing employees to caught-in and crushed-by hazards by requiring them to operate machines with non-functioning safety laser scanners. The scanners are designed to prevent employees from placing their bodies inside dangerous zones during the operating cycle.

"Hazards associated with the auto parts manufacturing industry are a source of serious injuries and fatalities to workers," said OSHA Acting Area Director Jose Gonzalez, in Mobile, Alabama. "Employers are required by law to comply with lockout/tagout and machine guarding standards to protect workers who operate equipment."

DOL Cites Georgia Tire Manufacturer, Contractors $523,000 for 22 Health and Safety Violations

June 1, 2019

OSHA issued 22 citations to Kumho Tire Georgia, Inc., Sae Joong Mold, Inc., and J-Brothers, Inc. from a follow-up inspection that found health and safety hazards at the tire manufacturing facility in Macon, GA. Collectively, the three companies are facing $523,895 in fines.

J-Brothers Inc. was cited for exposing employees to smoke inhalation and burn hazards by failing to mount portable fire extinguishers and failing to perform annual maintenance on fire extinguishers.

“Potential workplace hazards must be assessed and eliminated to ensure a safe work environment,” said OSHA Atlanta-East Area Director William Fulcher. “This employer exposed workers to multiple safety and health deficiencies that put them at risk for serious or fatal injuries.”
 

DOL Cites Texas Rubber Company $500,000 for Safety Violations

May 24, 2019

OSHA cited Custom Rubber Products LLC, operating in Houston, Texas, for not properly guarding machinery and exposing employees to severe injury. The company is facing $530,392 in fines which is the maximum penalty allowed by law.

“Employers are required to assess potential hazards, and make necessary corrections to ensure a safe workplace,” said OSHA’s Acting Regional Administrator in Dallas Eric S. Harbin. “The inspection results demonstrate workplace deficiencies existed putting workers at serious risk of injury.”


DOL Cites Texas Plant $615,000 for exposing workers to Highly Hazardous Chemicals

May 6, 2019

OSHA cited 7 S Packing LLC, doing business as Texas Packing Company in San Angelo, Texas, for exposing workers to hazardous chemicals. The company is facing $615,640 in fines.

OSHA found the meat-packing facility did not implement the required Process Safety Management (PSM) program to operate an ammonia refrigeration unit containing over 10,000 lbs. of anhydrous ammonia. The employer also failed to:
-Provide fall protection, guard machines and equipment
-Control hazardous energy
-Implement a respiratory protection program.
 

OSHA finds Texas Storage Tank Manufacturing Facility $281,000 for exposing employees to serious workplace hazards

April 30, 2019

The US DOL Investigation found that the Fort Worth, Texas Storage Tank Manufacturing facility exposed employees toserious workplace hazards and has fined Molding Acquisition Corporation, doing business as Rotoplas, $281,108. OSHA cited the Merced, CA based manufacturer of polyethylene storage tanks for 10 serious and two willful violations for exposing employees to fall hazards and also for not:
-Inspecting cranes
-Providing employees with forklift training
-Implement lockout/tagout procedures to prevent amputations.

DOL Cites Plastics Manufacturer $159,118

DOL Cites Plastics Manufacturer $159,118 for Exposing Employees to Amputations after Worker Injury

The US Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Heritage Plastics Incorporated for exposing employees to amputations at the company’s facility in Picayune, Mississippi. 

An employee suffered the amputation of four fingers when the mixing machine from which the employee was removing material unexpectedly started. OSHA inspectors determined that Heritage Plastics failed to require the use of a lockout device and train employees on procedures to control the release of hazardous energy. OSHA also cited the employer for failing to install machine guarding. The inspection is part of OSHA’s National Emphasis Program on Amputations.”

“Proper safety procedures, including the effective lockout of all sources of energy, could have prevented this employee’s serious injury,” said OSHA Jackson Area Office Director Courtney Bohannon. “Employers must take proactive steps to develop and implement energy control procedures to minimize risk to their employees.”
 

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OSHA Cites Southern New Jersey Contractor $440,000

April 4, 2019

The U.S. Department of Labor Cites Southern New Jersey Contractor $440,000 for Disregarding Fall Protection Requirements

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Brutus Construction Inc. for exposing employees to fall and other safety hazards at a worksite in Souderton, Pennsylvania. The company faces $181,699 in penalties.

An OSHA inspector observed employees working without fall protection on roofs at a residential construction site. OSHA cited Brutus Construction Inc. for willfully exposing employees to fall hazards, repeat safety hazards, and failure to provide fall protection training.

“Companies that fail to meet basic fall protection requirements place employees’ lives at risk,” said OSHA Allentown Area Director Jean Kulp.
 

OSHA Cites Georgia Battery Manufacturer $115,594 for Safety Hazards

March 6, 2019

The DOL cites Georgia Battery manufacturer $115,594 for Safety Hazards.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited United Stated Battery Manufacturing Company for exposing employees to unguarded machinery, lead and other safety hazards at its Augusta Georgia facility. 

OSHA cited the manufacturer for failing to record on OSHAs 300 log that it medically removed the employees from exposure, exposing employees to lead exceeding the permissible exposure limit and arsenic above the action level. The company failed to properly guard equipment. conduct training and implement a medical surveillance program.

“Elevated lead levels can cause debilitating and permanent health issues,” said OSHA Atlanta-East Area Director William Fulcher. “OSHA’s lead standard requires employers to minimize workers’ exposure by using measures including engineering controls, safe work practices, and providing protective clothing and equipment.”
 

OSHA Cites Texas Indoor Gun Range $214,387

February 4, 2019

The US Department of Labor Cites Texas Indoor Gun Range $214,387 for Exposing Employees to Unsafe Lead Levels

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) cited Tap Rack Bang Indoor Shooting Range, LLC operating as The Gun Range for exposing employees to unsafe levels of lead at its location in Killeen Texas. 

OSHA investigated the shooting range in August 2018 after receiving a complaint of worker exposure to lead during firing range activities. Inspectors found airborne lead exceeding the permissible exposure limit, and lead contamination on surfaces throughout the facility. OSHA cited the company for failing to replace damaged personal protective equipment, and medically monitor employees for lead-related illnesses; and for sweeping up lead debris rather than using vacuum methods with high-efficiency particulate air filters.
 

OSHA Cites United States Postal Service $149,664

January 10, 2019

The U.S. Department of Labor Cites United States Postal Service $149,664 after Heat-Related Worker Fatality in Southern California.

US DOL’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) cited the US Postal Service USPS for a repeated violation of OSHA’s General Duty Clause following the heat-related death of a Southern California mail carrier at Woodland Hills Post Office.

The employee suffered hyperthermia when delivering mail in July of 2018 when the outdoor temperature reached 117 degrees. The general duty violation addresses USPS’s programs and procedures for employees working in high heat environments. The USPS was also cited for a repeated violation of recordkeeping requirements related to recording heat stress incidents.

“The U.S. Postal Service knows the dangers of working in high-heat conditions and is required to address employee safety in these circumstances,” said OSHA Oakland Area Office Director Amber Rose. “USPS is responsible for establishing work practices to protect mail carriers who work outdoors from the hazards of extreme temperatures.”

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OSHA Cites Missouri Demolition Company $23,280

December 13, 2018

The U.S. Department of Labor Cites Missouri Demolition Company $23,280

U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited World Wrecking and Scrap Salvage Services Incorporated for not providing fall protection after two employees suffer fatal injuries at a demolition site in St. Louis Missouri.

The employees were cutting pipes while working from a suspended scaffold when the scaffold collapsed. OSHA inspectors found that the company failed to ensure that employees used a vertical life line and other fall protection, adequately train workers to recognize and avoid fall hazards and properly ground an electric motor used on the scaffold and conduct regular inspections of the scaffold equipment. 

“Providing fall protection for employees working at heights is not optional and can prevent tragedies,” said St. Louis Area Office Director Bill McDonald.
 

OSHA Cites Two Florida Roofing Contractors $129,336

November 27, 2018

The US Department of Labor Cites Two Florida Roofing Contractors $129,336 for Exposing Employees to Fall Hazards

The United States DOL’s cited Derek Williams operating as Elo Restoration Incorporated and Travis Slaughter operating as Florida Roofing Experts Incorporated for exposing employees to fall hazards at a St. Augustine, Florida worksite. 
 

OSHA Cites Alabama Company $25,868 for Protective Equipment Violations

October 25, 2018

The U.S. Department of Labor Cites Alabama Company $25,868 for Protective Equipment Violations

United States Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited Beverly Ohio based Globe Metallurgical Incorporated for personal protective equipment violations after an employee suffered fatal injuries at a facility in Selma, Alabama.

OSHA inspectors determined that the employee suffered fatal burns after an explosion from a molten silicon spill. OSHA cited the company for failing to ensure employees used personal protective equipment, inspect and maintain the safety of walking & working surfaces and for failing to assess work operations to determine the types of personal protective equipment needed.
 

OSHA cites Georgia Peanut Processing Facility $309,505

September 18, 2018  

The U.S. Department of Labor Cited Georgia Peanut Processing Facility $309,505

In Leesburg, Georgia, the United Stated DOL’s OSHA cited Great Southern Peanut LLC for health and safety violations after conducting a follow-up inspection as part of a formal settlement.

OSHA cited the company for failing to train employees on confined space hazards, develop & implement procedures for confined space entry, meet recordkeeping requirements and reduce compressed air to the required level.

“This employer failed to adhere to the terms of a formal agreement to correct workplace hazards identified in a previous inspection, continuing to put employees at risk of serious injury,” said OSHA Savannah Area Office Director Margo Westmoreland.
 
 

OSHA Cites Dallas Texas Dollar Tree Store $129,336 for Exposing Employees to Safety Hazards

August 3, 2018

United State Department of Labor Cites Dallas Texas Dollar Tree Store $129,336 for Exposing Employees to Safety Hazards.

The United States Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited Dollar Tree Stores Incorporated for exposing workers to fire, smoke and other hazards at one of their Dallas locations.

The store was inspected by OSHA after it received a referral by a whistleblower investigator claiming unsafe working conditions. OSHA cited the company for one willful violation for locking an emergency exit. The Agency and the company reached a corporate-wide settlement agreement to address unsafe conditions found at several stores in 2015.

“Locked emergency exits prevent quick evacuation in an emergency, needlessly placing employees at risk for serious harm,” said OSHA Dallas Area Director Basil Singh.
 

OSHA Cites Alabama Auto Parts Manufacturer $47,857 for Exposing Employees to Safety Hazards

July 20, 2018

United States Department of Labor Cites Alabama Auto Parts Manufacturer $47,857 for Exposing Employees to Safety Hazards

OSHA has cited the auto parts manufacturer Arkal Automotive USA Incorporated for exposing workers to electrical and amputation hazards. 

OSHA responded to a complaint about employees not being properly protected when entering injection molding machines. OSHA cited the employer for exposing employees to hazardous energy, inadequate machine guarding, failing to implement lockout tagout procedures when machine maintenance and servicing and failing to implement safety procedures for entering a robotic cage. 

“Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe injuries when they are not properly guarded and safety procedures are absent,” said OSHA Mobile Area Office Director Joseph Roesler. “Arkal Automotive USA Inc. failed to identify and correct hazards to ensure the safety and health of their employees.”
 

OSHA Cites Colorado Chemical Manufacturer $64,857

June 7, 2018

United States Department of Labor Cites a Colorado Chemical Manufacturer $64,857.

OSHA cited Greeley, Colorado based EnviroTech Services Incorporated after an employee died from a to lack of oxygen when cleaning the inside of a railcar. A second employee that tried to rescue the co-worker was also overcome but survived. 

DOL's OSHA cited the chemical manufacturer for failing to have an emergency rescue plan in place, provide respiratory protection, implement a permit required confined space program and for failing to properly ventilate a confined space.

“This fatality could have been prevented if the employer had complied with confined space requirements and provided protective equipment,” said Herb Gibson, OSHA Denver Area Office Director.
 

OSHA Cites Florida Health Facility $71,137

May 2, 2018   

The Department of Labor Cites Florida Health Facility $71,137 for Exposing Employees to Workplace Violence

US DOLs OSHA cites the operators of Bradenton based Suncoast Behavioral Health Center (Premier Behavioral Health Solutions of Florida Incorporated and UHS of Delaware Incorporated) for failing to protect employees from violence in the workplace. 

OSHA responded to a complaint that employees were not adequately protected from violent mental health patients. OSHA cited Premier Behavioral Health Solutions of Florida Incorporated and UHS of Delaware Incorporated who are subsidiaries of Universal Health Services Incorporated, for failing to institute controls to prevent patients from verbal and physical threats of assault including kicks, bites and punches and also from using objects as weapons. 

“This citation reflects a failure to effectively address numerous incidents over the past two years resulting in serious injuries to employees of the facility,” said Les Grove, OSHA Tampa Area Office Director.
 

DOL Orders California Company to Pay $110,000

April 20, 2018

United States Department of Labor Orders California Company to Pay $110,000 to Manager Who Reported Concerns Regarding E-Cigarette Ingredients

In San Francisco, California, the United Stated Dept. of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration ordered Mr. Good Vape LLC of Chino, Ca to reinstate a former manager and pay him $110,000 in compensation after he was fired for claiming the company’s production of flavored liquids for e-cigarette vapor inhalers violated federal environmental law.
 
“No one should lose his job for raising reasonable concerns about potential threats in the workplace,” said Barbara Goto, OSHA Regional Administrator.
 

OSHA Cites Kraft Heinz Food $109,939

March 16, 2018

The U.S. Department of Labor Cites Kraft Heinz Food $109,939 after Employee Injured by machine.

OSHA cited Kraft Heinz Foods Company for machine safety violations after an employee suffered a partial finger amputation when clearing a machine jam at the company’s Mason facility. 

OSHA inspectors found that Kraft Heinz Foods Company failed to train employees on the use of energy control procedures, implement energy control procedures to prevent equipment from unintentionally starting and for failing to install adequate machine guards and energy isolation devices.
 

OSHA Cites Colorado Nursing Home $9,054

February 5, 2018

The U.S. Department of Labor Cites Colorado Nursing Home $9,054 for Workplace Violence Hazards

OSHA has cited Pioneer Health Care Center of Rocky Ford for not protecting employees from violence in the workplace. 

OSHA opened an investigation at Pioneer Health Care Center in response to two complaints related to workplace violence received back in August of 2017. OSHA subsequently identified five documented incidents of workplace violence in 2017 that resulted in employee injuries along with many unreported incidents. OSHA had issued one serious citation for failing to implement adequate measures to protect employees from workplace violence hazards

“Employers are responsible for providing employees a safe and healthy workplace,” said OSHA’s Englewood Area Director David Nelson. “Pioneer Health Care Center must understand that their employees’ safety is important.”

Blood borne Pathogens Training Online is available to all Health Care Centers.
 
 

OSHA Cites Construction Company $59,864

January 23, 2018

UNited States Department of Labor Cites Construction Company $59,864 for Exposing Employees to Hazards and Proposes $59,864 in Penalties

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited Action Concrete Construction Incorporated for exposing its employees to fall hazards and eye injuries.

During its investigation of the company’s Panama City Beach worksite, OSHA inspectors found 1 willful violation for failing to install guardrails or use personal fall arrest systems while employees worked at a height of eleven feet. OSHA also cited the company for allowing employees to use a pneumatic air gun without proper eye protection. 
 
“Falls are the leading cause of fatal injuries in the construction industry,” said OSHA Area Office Director Brian Sturtecky, in Jacksonville. “Employers must provide adequate training and appropriate equipment to ensure the workers are protected.”
 

OSHA Cites Three Companies $220,497

December 27, 2017

United States Department of Labor Cites Three Companies $220,497 for Exposing Employees to Lead and other Hazards during the renovation of Chicago’s Old Post Office.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited 3 Chicago Illinois area companies that worked on renovating Chicago’s Old Post Office for not protecting their employees from lead and cadmium exposure. 
 
OSHA inspected the post office site back in August of 2017 after receiving referrals from the Chicago and The Illinois Department of Public Health..

OSHA found that Tecnica Environments Services Incorporated, American Demolition Corporation and Valor Technologies Incorporated did not provide training, comply with OSHA’s respiratory protection, and did not properly handle personal protective equipment. 
 
“It is well known that exposure to lead can cause chronic adverse health effects,” said Des Plaines Area Office OSHA Director Angelina Loftus. “Employers must monitor lead hazards and limit employee exposure through proper respiratory use, personal protective equipment, and training.”
 

OSHA Cites Three Queens Supermarkets $505,929 for Safety Violations

November 9, 2017

United States Department of Labor Cites Three Queens Supermarkets $505,929 for Safety Violations

Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited Trade Fair Supermarkets for exposing employees to health and safety hazards at 3 of its locations in Queens, New York. 

OSHA’s Queens District Office inspected supermarkets in Jackson Heights and Astoria. Inspectors found saw blades without safety guards, blocked exit routes, and a lack of eyewash stations needed in case of exposure to corrosive substances. The company did not train employees on hazardous chemicals used in the stores. 

“The recurrence and pattern of these violations is troubling,” said OSHA Area Director Kay Gee, who oversees Queens, Manhattan, and Brooklyn. “These grocery stores must focus on safety and make it a priority.”
 

OSHA Cites Pittsburgh Contractor $201,354

October 23, 2017

OSHA Cites Pittsburgh Contractor $201,354 after Hazards Lead to Fatal Electrocution

United States Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited a Pittsburgh masonry contractor for exposing workers to serious dangers including fall and electrical hazards after an employee is fatally electrocuted.

OSHA conducted an investigation of Ski Masonry LLC on April 20, 2017 after a 21-year-old laborer doing restoration work at a Pittsburgh residence was electrocuted. The residential and commercial masonry contractor received 2 willful and 5 serious citations for violations, including knowingly allowing employees to work within 10 feet of overhead, energized, and uninsulated electrical lines, failing to provide fall protection, and using scaffolding without a secure base plate.
 
"Ski Masonry knowingly took unacceptable risks when performing masonry work close to overhead powerlines," said OSHA Area Office Director Christopher Robinson, in Pittsburgh. "Companies must assess their worksites and follow all safety requirements to prevent such tragedies from recurring."
 

OSHA Cites Chicago Container Manufacturer $503,380

September 25, 2017

OSHA Cites Chicago Container Manufacturer $503,380 after 4 Workers Suffer Injuries

A Chicago manufacturer of rigid metal, plastic, and hybrid containers faces $503,380 in proposed penalties after inspectors from the United States Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration responded to four separate reports of workers suffering injuries at the facility.

As a result of its investigations, OSHA cited BWAY Corporation for five repeated and five serious safety violations of machine safety procedures, and placed the company in its Severe Violator Enforcement Program. In the past five years, 15 workers suffered amputations at the Chicago plant.

“Lack of machine safety guards and procedures contribute to multiple employee injuries nationwide each year,” said OSHA Area Director Kathy Webb, in Chicago. “Companies must continuously monitor their facilities, and review procedures and training to ensure employees are protected from machine hazards.”
OSHA found one employee suffered two broken bones in his hand after it was crushed by a piece of equipment. Three other employees suffered amputations from unguarded chain and sprocket assemblies.
 

OSHA Cites South Dakota Company $95,064

August 25, 2017

OSHA Cites South Dakota Company $95,064 after Worker Buried in Trench Collapse

United States Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited First Dakota Enterprises Incorporated for failing to protect its workers from trench collapse hazards.

A 34-year-old worker was completely buried on May 23, 2017 when the walls of a 14-foot trench collapsed around him. Co-workers quickly freed the victim’s head, which allowed him to breathe while emergency personnel worked for more than 30 minutes to free him.

OSHA investigators found that First Dakota Enterprises Incorporated failed to use a trench protective system or conduct regular site inspections to correct potentially hazardous conditions. OSHA cited the company, which was contracted by the City of Emery to replace the city’s main sewer and water lines, for two repeat and one serious safety violations.

“Trench collapses are preventable,” said OSHA Area Director Sheila Stanley in Sioux Falls. “It is critical that employers involved in excavation work review their safety procedures to ensure that employees are properly protected and trained. Had it not been for the heroic actions of these co-workers, this dangerous collapse may have ended in tragedy.”
 

OSHA finds machine safety hazards $610,034

June 28, 2017

OSHA finds machine safety hazards $610,034 for silica overexposure at Ohio steel plant

Amsted Rail Company Incorporated, a manufacturer of cast steel freight components, faces $610,034 in proposed penalties after agency investigators found workers at its Groveport plant exposed to machine hazards and silica.
 
OSHA discovered that 1 worker was hospitalized after suffering severe injuries when he was caught in a machine, and at least 4 workers were exposed to excessive levels of silica that can cause serious health issues.
 
"Companies must ensure their workers are trained in proper machine safety procedures and provided the necessary personal protective equipment to prevent injuries and illness on the job," said Dorothy Dougherty, deputy assistant secretary of labor for Occupational Safety and Health. "Continuous monitoring of facilities and procedures are important components of an effective safety and health program."
 

Ohio auto insulation manufacturer faces penalties of $569,463

May 4, 2017

Ohio auto insulation manufacturer faces penalties of $569,463 following worker injury, company cited for willful violations of machine safety procedures

An auto insulation manufacturer in suburban Toledo is facing penalties after an investigation by OSHA following a report that a machine amputated a 46-year-old worker's right hand, wrist and part of his forearm.
 

OSHA cited the company for the following:
 
 
-Inadequate machine and point of operation guarding
-Failing to properly train workers on machine specific procedures for isolating energy sources
-No "locking out" equipment to prevent unintentional energization
-Exposing workers to struck-by hazards from machine components

"This incident illustrates why companies must evaluate machine safety procedures to ensure they are adequate and effective in protecting workers from injuries on the job," said Dorothy Dougherty, deputy assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health. "In addition to being the law and the right thing to do, safe workplaces are an important component in supporting and sustaining job growth in America."
 

Wells Fargo ordered to pay about $5.4 million

April 3, 2017

"OSHA orders Wells Fargo to reinstate whistleblower fully restore lost earnings in banking industry

SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has ordered Wells Fargo Bank N.A. to compensate and immediately reinstate a former bank manager who lost his job after reporting suspected fraudulent behavior to superiors and a bank ethics hotline.

The manager, who had previously received positive job performance appraisals, was abruptly dismissed from his position at a Wells Fargo branch in the Los Angeles area after he reported separate incidents of suspected bank, mail and wire fraud by two bankers under his supervision. He was told he had 90 days to find a new position at Wells Fargo, and when he was unsuccessful, he was terminated. He has been unable to find work in banking since his termination in 2010.

An OSHA investigation concluded that the former manager's whistleblower activity, which is protected under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, was at least a contributing factor in his termination. OSHA does not release names of whistleblower complainants.

In addition to reinstating the employee and clearing his personnel file, Wells Fargo has been ordered to fully compensate him for lost earnings during his time out of the banking industry. Back pay, compensatory damages, and attorneys' fees were together calculated at about $5.4 million. Wells Fargo also must post a notice informing all employees of their whistleblower protections under Sarbanes-Oxley, widely known as "SOX."

Wells Fargo can appeal the order before the department's Office of Administrative Law Judges, but such action does not stay the preliminary reinstatement order."
 

OSHA proposes nearly $89,000 is penalties

January 17, 2017

OSHA proposes nearly $89,000 is penalties after finding concrete manufacturer again exposed workers to airborne silica.

The United States DOL's Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued citations on January 4, 2017 for 1 repeat and 2 failure-to-abate violations.

"Our follow-up inspection found that two County Concrete employees were exposed to silica above the permissible limit as they cleaned concrete mixers. In 2013, OSHA cited this company for these same hazards," said Kris Hoffman, director of OSHA's Parsippany Area Office. "Employers must bear the responsibility of fully complying with respiratory protection requirements to protect the safety and health of their workers."

OSHA cites lumber company $260,113

December 28, 2016
 
OSHA cites lumber company $260,113 for inadequate machine guards after worker suffers injury while setting up molding machine

Federal safety inspectors found electrical safety violations and multiple woodworking machines at a Wisconsin lumber company lacking adequate safeguards and that workers were not properly trained in isolating energy to machines to prevent contact with operating parts during set-up, servicing and maintenance.

"Despite earlier machine-related injuries, OSHA found several machines at the company lacked adequate safeguards to prevent workers from coming in contact with operating parts," said Robert Bonack, OSHA's area director in Appleton. "Menzner Lumber & Supply should immediately re-evaluate its safety and health programs and ensure their workers are properly trained."
 

OSHA orders J.C. Stucco and Stone fines totaling close to $344,960

November 23, 2016

OSHA orders J.C. Stucco and Stone fines totaling close to $344,960 

The company has nine cited federal safety and health violations and is assessed $344,960 in fines against Lansdowne masonry contractor, J.C. Stucco and Stone. This follows a March 2016, hearing regarding six willful and three repeat citations issued after two 2014 inspections by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

The independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission adjudicates disputes between the U.S. Secretary of Labor and employers that contest OSHA violations. These disputes are heard in the first instance by an Administrative Law Judge ("ALJ") whose decisions are reviewable by the full Commission.

"J.C. Stucco has a long history of leaving workers unprotected from incidents that can cause injuries and possible death and result from falls and unsafe scaffolding," said Theresa Downs, OSHA area director in Philadelphia. "Workers should not have to risk their lives for the sake of a paycheck."
 

OSHA cites Ohio vehicle parts manufacturer $536,249

October 24, 2016

OSHA cites Ohio vehicle parts manufacturer Milark Industries $536,249 for not protecting its workers from machine hazards
 
"Milark Industries continues to create an environment where employees are allowed to bypass machine safety procedures, and are threatened to be disciplined if they don't meet the production quotas. By doing so, the company is creating an unacceptable culture of risk and getting people hurt on the job," said Kim Nelson, OSHA's area director in Toledo.
 
 

OSHA fines roofer and home service contractor $61,731

September 27, 2016
 
OSHA fines roofer and home service contractor, JD Vigil Home Services Incorporated, and Big Valle Roofing $61,731 for ignoring fall risks to workers at a Colorado Springs work site.

"Failing to provide fall protection can have fatal consequences. Falls are a leading cause of death and serious injury in the construction industry," said David Nelson, OSHA's area director in Englewood. "We are determined to hold negligent employers accountable when they put their workers needlessly at-risk."

OSHA fines utility contractor $46,200

 August 1, 2016
 
OSHA fines utility contractor BC Main Construction $46,200 in fatal March 2016 crane failure at highway construction project in Hope County Arkansas

"B C Main Construction has a responsibility to ensure its employees are trained in all aspects of their duties and that the equipment they operate meets all safety standards," said Carlos Reynolds, OSHA's area director in Little Rock. "If the law had been followed, a man's life would not have been taken cruelly and his family would have been spared their grief."

OSHA cites East Hartford mattress recycler $74,520

 July 15, 2016
 
OSHA cites East Hartford, Connecticut Corporation Recyc-Mattress $74,520 for uncorrected, recurring, and new hazards to workers.

"Employers have a responsibility to maintain safe and healthful working conditions for their employees and to promptly and effectively correct hazards so they don't recur. They should be aware that OSHA can and does follow up to verify corrective action," said Warren Simpson, OSHA's area director in Hartford. "In this instance, employees were exposed to the risk of electric shock, being caught in a shredder, chemical hazards and being unable to exit the workplace swiftly in the event of a fire or other emergency. Recyc-Mattress Corp. must correct these hazards immediately."

SHA fines Window Master Incorporated restoration company $40,000

 June 7, 2016
OSHA fines Window Master Incorporated restoration company $40K for lead and other repeated, serious violations hazards.

"Over exposure to lead can cause permanent kidney, blood and reproductive damage," said Rosemarie Cole, Concord OSHA area director. "This employer needs to provide effective safeguards to correct hazards and prevent them from happening again."

OSHA fines 2 Pennsylvania contractors over $236,000

 May 19, 2016
 
OSHA fines 2 Pennsylvania contractors, Penn Stucco Systems Incorporated and BC Stucco and Stone, a total of over $236,000 for exposing employees to serious workplace dangers for a second time.
 
United States Department of Labor's OSHA issued citations to BC Stucco and Penn Stucco for repeat violations.

OSHA received a complaint alleging employees from both companies were working about 20 feet on a scaffold with major safety deficiencies including lack of safe access, bracing, stability and planking.

 
 

OSHA fines global manufacture $172,700

April 12, 2016
 
A global manufacturer of technologies, Alfa Laval Incorporated, faces $172,600 in OSHA fines for safety issues at their Houston, Texas site.

"Working on a machine without safety guards can cost someone a limb or their life," said Joann Figueroa, OSHA's area director in the Houston North office. "Alfa Laval has a responsibility to find and fix hazards in the workplace which endanger its employees. OSHA will not tolerate employers that ignore commonsense safety requirements."

Marriott Hotel faces $76,700 in OSHA Fines

March 9, 2016
 
Wardman Hotel LLC dba Marriott Wardman Park Hotel is facing $76,700 in fines at their Washington DC location for dozens of workplace health ans safety hazards.
 
Along the specific citations were deficiencies in the hotel's bloodborne pathogen and hazard communication programs.
 
 

Lancaster lawn care company cited $42,000

February 3, 2016
 
Lancaster lawn care company SNS Lawn and Landscape Services Incorporated dba The Ground Guys was cited $42,000 for exposing workers to lawn mowersafety hazards after employee has two toes amputated.

"This amputation and the incident that preceded it could have been prevented if The Ground Guys had only used the mower's protective system," said Kevin Kulp, director of OSHA's Harrisburg Office. "By ignoring this vital safeguard, the company is taking unnecessary risks with the safety of its employees, which is unacceptable."

OSHA cites Mississippi plastic manufacturer $56,340 after severe worker injuries

January 19, 2016

OSHA cites Mississippi plastic manufacturer after severe worker injuries

"Employer name: Mississippi Polymers Inc.
Citations issued: The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued citations to the employer on Jan. 14 for 11 serious safety violations.
Inspection findings: OSHA initiated two inspections after learning of two serious injuries that occurred in the fall of 2015. On Sept. 28, a 41-year-old print tender suffered severe injury when his hand entangled in a print roller and was crushed. Six days later on Oct. 4, a 59-year-old mill operator caught her hand in a print roller; the machine crushed her pinky finger so badly that a portion of the finger, up to the first joint, had to be amputated. Both workers were attempting to clean the machinery when the incidents happened.
OSHA cited Mississippi Polymers for exposing workers to unguarded rollers, rotating shafts and gears; failing to train workers on the specific procedures to prevent machinery from starting up during maintenance and servicing and not providing safety rails on stairs."

"This employer cannot continue to expose its employees to unguarded machinery and other serious safety hazards," said Eugene Stewart, OSHA's area director in Jackson. "Two workers were severely injured when protective guarding was available and could have prevented such incidents."
 

Area builder cited $162,000

December 21, 2015

Area builder cited for dangerous fall hazards twice in a month

"Don Bosco of Batavia puts workers at-risk again, OSHA proposes total fines of $162K

Twice in a month, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited a Batavia builder after an OSHA inspector saw employees working on a residential framing project without fall protection. The agency issued two willful and five serious safety citations to Don Bosco LLC on Dec. 17. Proposed penalties total $162,000.
Falls are a leading cause of death for construction workers, accounting for nearly 40 percent of construction fatalities in 2014.
On Aug. 25, 2015, an OSHA inspector observed eight employees doing residential construction in Wheaton. They razed rafters without fall protection, such as guardrails, safety nets or personal fall prevention devices. Further inspection found workers at risk of falls of more than 14 feet due to unguarded floor openings, unguarded windows, and unprotected sides, as they performed sheeting and other residential building activities."

“Don Bosco continues to ignore OSHA standards and is failing to protect its employees on the job,” said Jake Scott, OSHA’s area director in North Aurora. “OSHA will continue to monitor this employer for compliance, and do everything in its power to keep workers safely out of life-threatening working conditions.”
 

OSHA fines 2 Construction Company's $70,000

November 23, 2015
 
2 employers, Isabel Facundo Garcia and Ramco Erectors Incorporated, cited for exposing workers to fall hazards after a worker dies from fall at a construction site in Conroe, Texas.

"Falls are preventable. Ramco failed to comply with commonsense safety practices, and that cost a worker his life. Such negligence will not be tolerated," said Joann Figueroa, OSHA's area director in the Houston North office. "It is the employer's responsibility to find and fix hazards in the workplace."

OSHA fines U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for repeated violations

October 19, 2015
 
OSHA fines Pendills Creek National Fish Hatchery for employee amputation and asbestos hazards when working in their tanks and pits.
 
"Tanks and pits can be dangerous or fatal for workers lacking proper training and protection," said Larry Johnson, director of OSHA's Lansing Area Office. "Like private employers, federal agencies must correct safety and health deficiencies immediately. Failing to do so is inexcusable." 

Dollar General Corporation faces $169,000 in SHA Fines

 
September 28, 2015
 
Dollar General Corporation was cited by OSHA for exposing employees to health ans safety workplace hazards at some of their stores in the counties of Harrison and Boone. AMong the issues were improperly maintained fire extinguishers.

"Dollar General's negligence in protecting employees from these hazards despite the number of times they have been brought to the company's attention is alarming," said Prentice Cline, OSHA's area director in Charleston. "It only takes one fire emergency for workers to get hurt or killed because of the company's faulty safety practices. These hazards need to be eliminated immediately to prevent a tragic incident from occurring." 

OSHA cites Pipe insulator and staffing agency $85,950

August 17, 2015
 
OSHA cites staffing agency C & C Personnel LLC and pipe insulator Rock Wool Manufacturing Company of Houston, Texas $85,950 for exposing their workers to amputation hazards.
 
"Any time a worker is exposed to machinery without proper guarding is one more time that worker is in jeopardy of losing a limb or even a life. Failing to adhere to this commonsense safety requirement will not be tolerated," said Joann Figueroa, OSHA's area director in the Houston North office. "It is the employer's responsibility to find and fix hazards in the workplace."

OSHA proposes $77,000 in penalties

July 20, 2015

OSHA proposes fines of $77,000 against Metallurgical Products Incorporated for exposing employees to various mechanical, chemical, fire and  explosion hazards. The hazards also included a lack of training in Personal Protective Equipment.

"To ensure the health and well-being of its employees, Metallurgical Products Inc. must address and correct these hazards immediately," said Warren Simpson, OSHA's area director in Hartford. "Employers need to be proactive about safeguarding their employees against work-related hazards. It's not just good policy, it is good business." 

OSHA finds Zimmer TMT $56,000 for workers lacked training and plan to respond

January 22, 2015
OSHA finds Zimmer TMT workers lacked training and plan to respond when chlorine gas leaked at Parsippany, New Jersey plant.
 
"Accidental leak sickens 4 employees and results in $56,000 in fines

PARSIPPANY, N.J. – Workers were unprepared to respond to an accidental release of dangerous chlorine gas, leading to the evacuation and emergency medical treatment for several employees at Zimmer TMT's plant in Parsippany, an investigation by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration found.
Employees were moving a chlorine gas cylinder without a valve protective cap on Sept. 13, 2014, when the container fell and began to leak. Lacking training in how to respond, no emergency response plan in place and inadequate respiratory protection, the workers were sickened as they tried to contain the leak.
Four workers were transported to the hospital for observation and were treated and released later that day. Multiple workers were evaluated by Emergency Medical Services at the scene but did not require hospitalization."

"Zimmer TMT is in the business of healthcare and should be aware of the potential health and safety hazards to which its employees could be exposed," said Kris Hoffman, director of OSHA's Parsippany Area Office. "Chlorine gas is poisonous and can cause death. Employers using highly hazardous chemicals absolutely must be prepared for emergencies, and this company clearly was not."
 
 

$66,400 is fines issues

December 29, 2014

"Exposing workers to electrical shock and other hazards yields fines of $66,400 for Troy, Texas manufacturer

Twice in 18 months, C & H Die Casting Inc. has exposed workers to safety hazards, the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration found, leading the agency to cite the Troy-based company for 15 serious safety and health standards violations with proposed penalties of $66,400."

"Once again, C & H has failed to provide a workplace free from hazards that could seriously harm workers," said Casey Perkins, OSHA's area director in Austin. "Waiting until a worker has been injured or killed to find and fix these hazards is unacceptable."
During the 2013 inspection, C & H Die Casting was cited for violating 30 serious safety and health OSHA standards, including using spliced electrical cords. The citations carried $112,500 in proposed fines. In September 2014, inspectors discovered workers still being exposed to electrical shock hazards. This repeated violation carried a $22,000 penalty. A repeated violation exists when an employer has been cited previously for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years.
Also cited were 14 serious safety violations with a $44,400 penalty. OSHA cited the serious violations for failure to repair damaged and uneven concrete floors; failure to guard belts, pulleys and shafts; and numerous electrical violations, including spliced welding cables, uncovered welding terminals, missing grounding prongs on electrical cords and unlabeled circuit breaker panels.
OSHA investigators also witnessed an employee in the furnace area pouring hot metal into dies without proper personal protective equipment, which exposed him to burn hazards. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.
 
 

OSHA cites San Antonio staffing agency and fruit processor $135,200

June 30, 2014
 
OSHA cites San Antonio staffing agency iWOrks Personnel Incorporated and fruit processor Fresh From Texas Incorporated $135,200 for exposing temporary workers to serious health ans safety hazards.

"Workers, whether employed directly by the company or as a temporary worker, require proper training on workplace hazards. In this case, both Fresh From Texas and iWorks failed to do so and put workers in danger," said Kelly C. Knighton, OSHA's area director in San Antonio. "Both host employers and staffing agencies have roles in complying with workplace health and safety requirements, and they share responsibility for ensuring worker safety and health."
 

StanChem Inc faces $55,300 in OSHA fines

January 13, 2014

Connecticut manufacturer cited by US Labor Department's OSHA for chemical hazards; StanChem Inc., faces $55,300 in fines

United States Department of Labor's OSHA cited StanChem Incorporated for 13 serious violations of workplace safety standards at its East Berlin, Connecticut manufacturing plant. 
 
"Under OSHA's process safety management standard*, employers are required to develop, implement and update process safety management programs with regards to hazardous chemicals at their facilities. OSHA's inspection of StanChem found several deficiencies in the plant's process safety management program to identify, address and eliminate hazards associated with processes using, storing, manufacturing, handling or moving of large amounts of highly hazardous chemicals onsite. In this case, the hazardous chemical is the flammable liquid, vinyl acetate, which is used in large amounts at the company's plant."
 
"The requirements of OSHA's process safety management standards are stringent and comprehensive because failure to effectively implement a process safety management program can lead to a catastrophic incident," said Warren Simpson, OSHA's area director in Hartford. "The safety and well-being of the plant's employees are dependent on the employer effectively addressing all conditions, equipment and procedures involved in the polymer manufacturing process."
 

Rite Aid cited by OSHA for $83,200

December 19, 2013

Rite Aid cited by United States Labor Department's OSHA for safety hazards at Kings Highway store in Brooklyn, NY; proposed fines total $83,200

Pennsylvania drugstore chain's workers exposed to fall and laceration hazards

OSHA cited Rite Aid for repeat and serious violations of workplace safety standards at the retailer's store located at 185 Kings Highway in Brooklyn. 
 
"Significant hazards can exist in retail operations. In this case, employees faced potential injuries from severe lacerations and falls of up to 11 feet due to a lack of required safeguards," said Kay Gee, OSHA's area director for Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens. "Employers should take effective steps to ensure that safety measures are in place and in use at all their workplaces."
Inspectors found workers at the Kings Highway store exposed to falls of up to 11 feet through an unguarded opening adjacent to a conveyor used to move stock from the basement to the sales floor level. Workers also faced laceration hazards due to an uncovered section between a conveyor belt and its drive mechanism. In addition, accumulated merchandise and garbage on the storage room floor exposed workers to trip-and-fall hazards.
OSHA issued Rite Aid one repeat citation with a fine of $70,000 for the fall hazard. A repeat violation exists when an employer previously has been cited for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years. OSHA cited Rite Aid in 2012 for a similar hazard at another Brooklyn store at 7118 Third Ave.
Two serious citations, carrying $13,200 in fines, were issued for the unguarded conveyor belt and the trip-and-fall hazards. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.
 
 

OSHA cites Accadia Site Contracting Incorporated $84,000

May 23, 2013

OSHA cited Accadia Site Contracting Incorporated $84,000 in fines for cave-in hazard at Niagara Falls work site.

"An unprotected excavation can turn into a grave in seconds, crushing and burying workers beneath tons of soil before they have an opportunity to react or escape," said Arthur Dube, OSHA's area director in Buffalo. "These workers were fortunate¿not lucky, because workplace safety must never be dependent on luck¿that they were not injured or killed."

"The coming of warmer weather and the accompanying thaw of the soil bring with them an increase in excavation work. Unfortunately, it also brings an increase in cave-in hazards and unsafe work practices," said Dube. "Before any employee enters an excavation to perform work, the employer must ensure that the excavation is properly safeguarded against collapse, the employees are trained to recognize and avoid cave-in hazards and all required equipment is present and properly maintained." 

OSHA proposes $459,844 in fines to Panthera Painting

January 30, 2013

OSHA proposes $459,844 in fines to Panthera Painting Incorporated for exposing workers to lead and other health and safety hazards.

OSHA cited Canonsburg based Panthera Painting Incorporated with 38 alleged violations including fourteen willful and eleven repeat work sites in Slatedale, Harrisburg and Slatington. There, workers were exposed to lead and other health and safety hazards when performing abrasive repainting and blasting projects. 
 
"The employer's refusal to correct the hazards, along with its history of failing to correct hazards, demonstrates a clear resistance to worker safety and health and leaves workers vulnerable to potential illnesses and injuries from overexposure to lead and other hazards," said MaryAnn Garrahan, OSHA regional administrator in Philadelphia. "Employers have a legal responsibility to provide workers with safe and healthful workplaces. Anything less is unacceptable."
 

OSHA fines Timken Company $170,500

December 16, 2012
 
OSHA fines Timken Company $170,500 after complaint inspection finds 12 safety violations at Canton, Ohio, steel mill

OSHA cited Timken Company for twelve alleged safety violations including 5 repeat after conducting a complaint inspection this past June at the steel mill in Canton where roller bearings are manufactured.
 
"Timken Co. has a responsibility to recognize safety hazards in its facility and to train workers in emergency response," said Howard Eberts, OSHA's area director in Cleveland. "When employers knowingly ignore safety and health requirements, they are unduly placing their workers at risk for illnesses and injuries, and that is unacceptable."
 

OSHA proposes $82,500 in fines to a chemical manufacturer

Aug. 17, 2012

OSHA proposes $82,500 in fines to a chemical manufacturer for workplace health and safety hazards at Newark, New Jersey Facility.
 
"Process safety management prevents or mitigates a catastrophic release of toxic, reactive or flammable liquids and gases in chemical processes," said Kris Hoffman, director of OSHA's Parsippany Area Office. "By not complying with PSM requirements, Cardolite jeopardized the safety of its chemical operators and others working at the site by exposing them to dangerous fire hazards. This negligent behavior will not be tolerated."

OSHA proposes $169,000 in fines to Hartford, Connecticut contractor

January 25, 2012

OSHA proposes $169,000 in fines to Hartford, Connecticut contractor for repeatedly exposing workers to cave-in hazards

Occupational Safety and Health Administration proposed $169,000 in fines against contractor Penney Construction Company LLC in Hartford mainly for exposing its workers to cave-in hazards while repairing a sewer line in a ten foot deep trench on Park St.
 
"This employer repeatedly sent its workers into harm's way even after being told that the unguarded trench posed a clear, immediate and potentially deadly threat," said Paul Mangiafico, OSHA's area director in Hartford. "These workers could have been crushed or buried alive in seconds."
 

OSHA fines LaBolt, SD Farmers grain company more than $95,920

December 30, 2011 

OSHA fines LaBolt, SD Farmers grain company more than $95,920 for exposing workers to unsafe working conditions

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued LaBolt Farmers Grain Company, Incorporated in LaBolt, South Dakota thirteen citations for exposing workers to unsafe conditions at its grain handling facility where a worker got caught in a moving bin sweep auger & suffered severe injuries to his leg and arm. .
 
"Despite awareness of the hazardous nature of grain bin entries and of the means and methods to prevent such hazards, the employer failed to develop and enforce recognized safe work practices," said Tom Deutscher, OSHA's area director in Bismarck.
 

Lack of trained employees leads to fines issued

Worker's Chain Saw Injury Leads to $153,600 Penalty

Three willful violations with penalties of $147,000 involve not providing protective leg coverings and eye or face shields to employees who operated chain saws, and not providing hard hats to employees working on the ground under trees.

Sep 07, 2011

OSHA has cited Gainesville Tree Service Co. of Alachua, Fla., for six safety violations carrying proposed penalties of $153,600. OSHA began an inspection after a worker suffered a serious cut to his thigh by a chain saw at a Gainesville jobsite in March.

Three willful violations with penalties of $147,000 involve not providing protective leg coverings and eye or face shields to employees who operated chain saws, and not providing hard hats to employees working on the ground under trees.

Two serious violations carrying $6,600 in penalties involve failing to have a person adequately trained to provide first aid, make adequate first-aid supplies readily available in the workplace, and have a written plan designed to eliminate or minimize employee exposure to bloodborne pathogens. The company had not developed an emergency response or rescue plan for employees injured in trees, aerial lifts, or other situations.

One other-than-serious citation with no monetary penalty was cited for failing to develop a hazard communication program that included material safety data sheets as well as training for employees using flammable liquids and petroleum lubricants.

"OSHA expects employers to be proactive by providing the protective equipment needed to prevent injuries, rather than wait for an incident with severe consequences, such as this one, to occur," said Brian Sturtecky, OSHA's area director in Jacksonville.

OSHA proposes fines totaling $212,000 to Lincoln Paper & Tissue LLC

March 16, 2011

OSHA proposes fines totaling $212,000 to Lincoln Paper & Tissue LLC in Maine for recurring hazards after a worker injury
 
"The sizable fines proposed reflect not only the severity of the hazards found here but also the fact that several of these conditions are similar to hazards cited and corrected following our 2008 inspection of the mill," said William Coffin, OSHA's area director for Maine. "Abating a hazard but allowing it to recur puts employees at risk anew from conditions that should not have existed in the first place. They must be corrected promptly, fully and permanently for the safety of the mill's workers."

OSHA fines Mississippi furniture manufacturer $66,000

February 22, 2011

OSHA fines Mississippi furniture manufacturer United Furniture Industries Incorporated proposed penalties totaling $66,000 for serious, repeat health and safety violations.
 
"There is no excuse for a company to disregard the safety and welfare of its workers by not following OSHA's safety standards," said Clyde Payne, OSHA's area director in Jackson. "Employers that ignore safe practices and OSHA regulations are inviting tragedy into the lives of their workers."

OSHA cites McEntire's Roofing of Lincoln, Illinois $102,000

January 31, 2011

US Labor Department's OSHA cites McEntire's Roofing of Lincoln, Illinois $102,000 for failing to provide fall protection for workers

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has issued McEntire's Roofing Incorporated 6 citations for failing to provide fall protection for roofers working residential projects. 
 
The citations are the result of 2 OSHA investigations conducted under the Local Emphasis Program on Fall Hazards, which occured in July and September of 2010 at jobsites in Bloomington and Lincoln, Illinois. 2 willful citations totaling $56,000 in penalties were issued after inspectors watched roofers being allowed to work without fall protection at 2-story residential projects. Willful violations exists once an employer has demonstrated either an intentional disregard for the requirements of the law or an indifference to employee health and safety.
 
"Falls are a leading cause of injury and death in the workplace," said Thomas Bielema, OSHA's area director in Peoria, Ill. "McEntire's Roofing repeatedly has been cited for not providing adequate fall protection and that is unacceptable. OSHA is committed to ensuring employers abide by the law, which requires commonsense safety practices."
 

OSHA proposes $238,000 in fines against US Postal Service

December 29, 2010

US Labor Department's OSHA proposes $238,000 in fines against US Postal Service for electrical hazards at Shrewsbury, Massachusetts mail processing facility

Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited the U.S. Postal Service for willful and serious violations of safety standards following an inspection at the Central Massachusetts Processing and Distribution Center in Shrewsbury. The Postal Service faces $238,000 in fines mainly for exposing workers to electrical hazards.

Blood borne Pathogens Training Online and full OSHA certification in minutes.



 
"These sizable fines reflect the Postal Service's knowledge of and failure to address these hazards," said Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA Dr. David Michaels. "For years, the Postal Service knew that allowing untrained employees to work on electrical equipment exposed workers to serious injury or worse. Despite this knowledge, the Postal Service did not take the necessary steps to change its practices and eliminate the hazards."
 

Hospital BBP Violations

Hospitals seeing red, as in more bloodborne pathogens violations

 October 12th, 2011

                 OSHA has hit hospitals with more and higher fines for bloodborne pathogens violations compared to last year, according to October issue of Briefings on Infection Control. The report uses data from the OSHA Office of Management System, from July 2010 through June 2011. Here is an excerpt.

                 OSHA has been busier this year than last year in handing out bloodborne pathogens violations to hospitals. Not only have the number of violations increased, but the average fine amount has also jumped.

                Every year, HCPro’s OSHA Healthcare Advisor acquires a detailed report of citations by standard for various types of healthcare facilities from the OSHA Office of Management Systems. This year’s data covers all federal and state citations from July 2010 through June 2011.

                During that time, OSHA issued 575 violations referencing the Bloodborne Pathogens standard for general medical and surgical, psychiatric, and specialty hospitals, an increase of 30% from last year.

                 Average OSHA fines also increased. Hospitals averaged $630 per bloodborne pathogens violation compared to last year’s average fine of $477.

OSHA fines Cooper Tire & Rubber Company $213,500 for willful, serious and repeat health and safety violations

November 29, 2010
 
US Labor Department's OSHA fines Cooper Tire & Rubber Company $213,500 for willful, serious and repeat health and safety violations
 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited Cooper Tire & Rubber Company manufacturer of automotive and truck tires with 10 alleged health and safety violations for failing to provide fall protection from distances of more than 9 feet, failing to provide proper hazardous chemical protection to its workers and for unnecessarily exposing them to fire and explosion hazards.
 
"The lack of employee protection from fire, explosions and hazardous chemicals is completely unacceptable," said Jule Hovi, OSHA's area director in Toledo, Ohio. "OSHA is committed to ensuring workers have a safe and healthful workplace, and failing to follow proper safety and health procedures puts workers at unnecessary risk."
 

OSHA proposes $83,650 in fines to Oneida County, New York manufacturer

October 5, 2010

US Labor Department's OSHA proposes $83,650 in fines to Oneida County, New York manufacturer for 34 alleged safety violations

US Dept. of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited The Fountainhead Group Incorporated of New York Mills 34 serious violations of the Occupational Safety and Health Act. The company that manufactures agricultural hand sprayers for consumers, faces a total of $83,650 in proposed fines after a comprehensive safety inspection that was conducted under OSHA's Site-Specific Targeting Program.
 
"This inspection identified a broad cross-section of hazards which, if uncorrected, expose employees to potential falls, electric shock, crushing, burns or machinery injuries," said Christopher Adams, OSHA's area director in Syracuse. "The employer must take and maintain effective corrective action for the safety of workers at this plant."
 

OSHA cites Smackover Arkansas refinery with $165,600 in penalties for alleged health and safety violations

September 21, 2010

US Labor Department's OSHA cites Smackover Arkansas refinery with $165,600 in penalties for alleged health and safety violations

U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued citations to Martin Operating Partnership LP for one alleged willful & 21 alleged serious violations of federal health and safety regulations. 
 
"This company failed to follow OSHA's standards and procedures as they relate to process safety management," said Carlos Reynolds, OSHA's area director in Little Rock, Ark. "Employers are responsible for providing a safe and healthful workplace. In this case, it is fortunate that no serious injuries or fatalities occurred."
 

OSHA orders Utah Transit Authority to pay over $130,000

August 26, 2010

U.S. Labor Department's OSHA orders Utah Transit Authority to pay over $130,000 to former worker in whistleblower case

U.S. Department of Labor's OSHA ordered the Utah Transit Authority that is headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah, to immediately reinstate a wrongfully discharged employee to his former position and pay over $130,000 in back wages with interest, attorney's fees and compensatory damages. OSHA recently completed an investigation and determined the Utah Transit Authority discharged the worker in violation of the whistleblower provision of the Federal Railroad Safety Act.
 

OSHA proposes $257,500 in fines against two employers following explosion

July 26, 2010

US Labor Department's OSHA proposes $257,500 in fines against two employers following explosion at Nashua, NH, manufacturing plant

United States Department of Labor's OSHA, which stands for Occupational Safety and Health Administration, cited Worthen Industries Incorporated, a manufacturer of adhesives and glues. S.L. Chasse Welding & Fabrication Incorporated steel erection contractor from Hudson, New Hampshire is also cited for alleged violations of workplace safety standards after an explosion on January 23rd at Worthen's manufacturing plant on East Spit Brook Rd. The combined penalties to both employers total $257,500. 
 
"Welding should not have been permitted until all feasible steps had been taken to remove flammable materials and the potential for ignition," said Rosemarie Ohar, OSHA's area director for New Hampshire. "This problem combined with numerous additional safety and health hazards identified at the Worthen plant account for the sizable proposed fines." 

Protect your employees with the required OSHA Training including Blood Borne Pathogens Training Online.
 

OSHA proposes $125,800 in fines against Brooklyn New York contractor

June 1, 2010

US Labor Department's OSHA proposes $125,800 in fines against Brooklyn New York contractor after partial building collapse

US Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration, also known as OSHA, has cited a precast concrete installation contractor, New York Plank Services LLC for allegedly willful and serious violations of safety standards after a partial building collapse in Brooklyn. The contractor faces a total of $125,800 in fines.
 
"While it is fortunate that no workers were injured in this incident, they were still exposed to crushing hazards during the event and to fall hazards afterward," said Kay Gee, OSHA's area director for Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens. "These sizable fines reflect the gravity of the hazards and the employer's knowledge that these vital and required safeguards were ignored."
 

OSHA proposes $48,500 against Tonawanda Coke Corporation for 14 serious violations

May 7, 2010
 
US Labor Department's OSHA proposes $48,500 against Tonawanda Coke Corporation for 14 serious violations

U.S. Department of Labor's OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) proposed $48,500 in fines against Tonawanda Coke Corporation for 14 alleged violations of workplace safety and health standards at the organiations River Road plant in Tonawanda, New York where it produces a coal by-product, foundry coke. The citations address deficiencies involving the plants industrial hygiene, respiratory protection program, coke oven operations and use of PPE (personal protective equipment).
 
"Ensuring the health and safety of workers in coke oven operations makes it essential that effective and proper safeguards be in place and in use at all times in this type of work environment," said Arthur Dube, OSHA's area director in Buffalo. "Safeguards encompass respiratory protection, personal protective equipment, correct work practices and engineering controls, the primary means of minimizing workers exposure to airborne contaminants."
 
The plant failed to implement work specific procedures in the planet's respiratory protection program, properly train workers on the storge, use and maintenance of respirator selection and also verifying the use of protective clothing by employees.
 

OSHA proposes $106,800 in fines against Buffalo, NY, sheet metal fabricator

April 28, 2010
 
OSHA proposes $106,800 in fines against Buffalo, NY, sheet metal fabricator for uncorrected and recurring hazards
 
The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration proposed $106,800 in fines against Service Manufacturing Group Inc., mainly for uncorrected and recurring hazards at the company's Scajaquada Street sheet metal fabrication plant in Buffalo New York.
 
OSHA cited Service Manufacturing Group in total for 12 violations of safety standards in March 2009. The company agreed to correct all hazards but did not submit proof of abatement. OSHA then opened a follow up inspection in October 2009 and discovered eight of the 12 violations had not been corrected.
 
OSHA then issued the company 8 failure to abate notices, totaling $100,500 in fines. The uncorrected conditions include uninspected overhead cranes, lifting slings and fire extinguishers; failure to electrically interconnect containers while dispensing flammable liquids; missing gauges to ensure proper air velocity in paint spray booths; and failure to medically evaluate an employee's fitness to wear a respirator.
 
"Each of these conditions can have a serious impact on the health or safety of workers at the plant," said Arthur Dube, OSHA's area director in Buffalo. "The ongoing failure to rectify these hazards continually exposes workers to potential fire and crushing injuries. These conditions must be addressed promptly, completely and effectively."
 

OSHA proposes $55,500 in penalties against American Warming and Ventilating Inc. for safety violations

March 18, 2010
 
OSHA proposes $55,500 in penalties against American Warming and Ventilating Inc. for safety violations
 
The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited American Warming and Ventilating Inc. in Bradner with $55,500 in proposed penalties for alleged serious and repeat violations of federal workplace safety and health standards.
OSHA opened an inspection at American Warming and Ventilating Inc. in January as part of its site-specific targeting program due to the company's high injury and illness rates in comparison to the national rates.
 
As a result of the inspection, OSHA has issued six serious violations for lack of proper fall protection equipment, improper electrical lockout and tagout procedures to prevent accidental energization start-up, lack of proper machine guarding, lack of proper training for maintenance personnel on power press equipment, damaged welding conductors and lack of eye protection during welding. An OSHA violation is serious if death or serious physical harm can result from a hazard an employer knew or should have known exists.
 
The company also has received two repeat violations for failing to have proper machine guarding and to provide workers approved electrical protective equipment. OSHA issues repeat violations when it finds a substantially similar violation of any standard, regulation, rule or order at any of an employer's other facilities in federal enforcement states when that employer has been cited in the past.
 
"These types of violations show the blatant disregard the company has for the safety and welfare of its employees," said OSHA Area Director Jule Hovi in Toledo, Ohio. "Those who ignore safe practices and OSHA regulations are inviting tragedy into the lives of their workers."
 

OSHA proposes $59,250 in penalties against CW Industries for willful and serious safety and health violations

February 4, 2010

OSHA proposes $59,250 in penalties against C&W Industries for willful and serious safety and health violations.

U.S. Department of Labor's OSHA is proposing $59,250 in penalties against C&W Industries in Union Springs, Alabama for health and safety violations.

OSHA started its inspection August of 2009 after receiving a complaint of a number of deficiencies at the plant including unguarded machinery that exposes workers to amputation hazards. Other complaints included insufficient training and certification for forklift operators, and deficiencies in the plants fire prevention system.

OSHA cited the company with one willful safety violation with a $38,500 penalty for failing to protect workers from caught-in and amputation hazards while cleaning, changing dies and performing maintenance on press machines. The inspection revealed the employer had failed to implement lockout tagout procedures to prevent accidental energy start-up despite being aware of its obligation to institute such a program.

"Workers should not have to risk amputations in order to earn a paycheck," said Kurt Petermeyer, director of OSHA's Mobile Area Office. "Company management was aware of the requirements to establish a lockout program and did not take action."

US Labor Department's OSHA is proposing over $135,000 in penalties against Atlanta stone countertop manufacturer

January 27, 2010

US Labor Department's OSHA is proposing $133,875 in penalties against Atlanta stone countertop manufacturer for health hazards

Atlanta Intown Granite is being cited for failing to correct previous violations.

 

U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration, otherwise known as OSHA, has cited Atlanta Intown Granite Company in Atlanta for continuing to expose its employees to health hazards for over a year after OSHA cited the company for similar violations.

OSHA proposes $133,875 in penalties against the company for exposing workers to excess amounts of silica by not fully implementing a respiratory protection program, failing to fully implement a hearing conservation program and failing to establish a written hazard communication program on exposure to hazardous substances.

Exposure to silica can lead to silicosis, a disabling, nonreversible and potentially fatal lung disease. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health reports that each year more than 250 people die from and hundreds more are disabled by silicosis.

"Silica and noise exposure remain serious hazards to employees at work, but both hazards are 100 percent preventable if employers fully implement protection programs," said Andre Richards, director of OSHA's Atlanta-West Area Office.

 

OSHA proposes more than $266,000 in penalties against Tucker Georgia manufacturer

December 10, 2009

The US Department of Labor's OSHA proposes more than $266,000 in penalties against Tucker, Georgia manufacturer following worker amputations

Crespac, Inc. is cited with willful, repeat and serious health and safety violations

Crespac Inc. has been cited with 34 health and safety violations by the U.S. Department of Labor's OSHA. Proposed penalties total $266,400.

"OSHA began its comprehensive safety and health inspection after learning of two separate incidents resulting in amputations within a 30-day period," said Gei-Thae Breezley, director of OSHA's Atlanta-East Area Office. "In both instances, management knew of deficiencies but acted with plain indifference by failing to correct the problems in a timely manner that could have prevented these amputations."

OSHA is citing Crespac, Inc. Four repeat, three willful, 19 serious and one other-than-serious safety violations, and also five serious and 2 other-than-serious health violations. OSHA is proposing an additional $17,200 for the health violations in addition to the $249,200 for the safety violations.

OSHA proposes fines of $509,000 against Cranesville Aggregate

November 12, 2009

OSHA proposes fines of $509,000 against Cranesville Aggregate for significant hazards at its Scotia, New York bagging plant

Cranesville Aggregate Co. doing business as Scotia Bag Plant, Scotia in New York faces $509,000 in total of proposed fines by the DOL's Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The plant which bags cement and asphalt has been cited for 33 alleged willful, repeat and serious violations of workplace Health and safety standards following thorough OSHA inspections over the past six months.

"The significant fines proposed here reflect the breadth and gravity of hazards found at this plant, their recurring nature and this employer's knowledge," said acting Assistant Secretary for OSHA Jordan Barab.

"Workers have been needlessly exposed to potentially disabling or fatal respiratory illness, falls, crushing injuries, burns, lacerations, amputation and electrocution," added Edward Jerome, OSHA's area director in Albany. "This employer needs to take effective and ongoing corrective action to protect the health and safety of these workers."

OSHA proposes $254,000 in fines for lead hazards at Franklin, New Hampshire foundry

October 23, 2009

OSHA proposes $254,000 in fines for lead hazards at Franklin, New Hampshire foundry

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited Franklin Non-Ferrous Foundry, Inc. for 17 alleged willful, serious violations of workplace health & safety standards.

The Franklin, N.H., foundry faces $254,000 in fines after comprehensive OSHA inspections began in April.

"Chief among the hazards identified in the foundry are inadequate or absent protections for workers whose duties expose them to airborne concentrations of lead," said Rosemarie Ohar, OSHA's area director in New Hampshire. "Lead is a subtle and insidious hazard that can seriously damage the blood-forming, nervous, urinary and reproductive systems. This reality makes it imperative that employers monitor their workers' lead exposure levels, provide effective respiratory protection and promptly remove workers from exposure when necessary."

OSHA determined the foundry didn’t provide required biological monitoring for workers exposed to lead, and that they did not properly fit-test or make sure adequate respiratory protection was provided for those workers. Required benefits were also not provide for workers medically removed from work from lead overexposure.

OSHA proposes $91,275 in penalties against Griffin Industries

September 9, 2009

OSHA proposes $91,275 in penalties against Griffin Industries rendering plant in Starke, Florida.

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration inspected a Griffin Industries site in Starke, Florida, citing it with one willful violation and a $55,000 proposed penalty for not providing workers with fall protection when working above an industrial blender. A willful violation is defined as one committed with plain indifference to or intentional disregard for employee safety and health. A repeat violation is also issued with a $25,000 proposed penalty for the company's continuing failure to conduct an annual audit of its lockout tagout of energy source procedures for equipment. A repeat citation is issued when the employer has been previously cited for a substantially similar hazard in the past three years.

Other violations with proposed penalties totaling $11,275 are for not shutting down equipment during clearing operations, failing to anchor a machine, not providing a lock to lock-out equipment, and not covering a floor hole.

Serious violations are issued in situations when there is a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard that the employer knew or should have known. Other-than-serious violations are defined as situations where exposure cannot reasonably be predicted to cause death or serious physical harm to employees but the violation would have a direct impact on the employee health or safety.

Griffin Industries c, based in Cold Spring, Kentucky, collects and recycles agricultural waste, meat and poultry by-products, grocery scraps, restaurant grease and waste from the bakery industry.

"Fall hazards continue to be a leading cause of employee deaths in the workplace and should never be overlooked in any industry," said OSHA's area director in Jacksonville, Florida, James Borders.

385,000 sharps-related injuries occur annually

An estimated 385,000 sharps-related injuries occur annually among health care workers in hospitals alone, exposing them to bloodborne pathogens. A new initiative focuses on raising awareness of the risks and trying to persuade workers to make changes necessary to reduce sharps injuries.

Stop Sticks is a community-based program announced by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C are among the bloodborne pathogens that can result from needlesticks and other sharps-related injuries in the workplace.

While operating room and emergency department personnel are especially at risk, clinical and nonclinical health care workers and health care administrators in hospitals, doctors' offices, nursing homes, and home health care agencies also may be exposed. NIOSH says the first step to reducing the risk is making health care workers aware of the magnitude of the problem.

According to the Exposure Prevention Information Network, sharps-related injuries in nonsurgical hospital settings decreased more than 31 percent from 2001 to 2006 following the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act of 2000. But surgical settings saw an increase in injuries of more than 6 percent during the same time period, where adoption of safety devices was limited compared to the nonsurgical settings.

The network also says about half of sharps injuries go unreported. The idea of the campaign is to raise awareness of the problem and encourage changes in organizations' safety cultures and the use of safer sharps devices and practices.

"Safer sharps devices have engineering controls that are built into the product and prevent sharps injuries," according to NIOSH. "Safer sharps devices come in various types -- from devices that contain a protective shield over the needle to those that do not use a needle at all, and includes sharps containers. All traditional devices have safer alternatives that are highly effective in substantially reducing injuries."

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